Super Eagles climb three places on FIFA rankings

Super Eagles climb three places on FIFA rankings

Nigeria’s Super Eagles leaped from the 44th spot of September FIFA Coca-Cola World Rankings to 41st position in the latest rankings released on Monday.

The Eagles had dropped six places last month but has now risen after securing qualification for next year’s FIFA World Cup in Russia following their 1-0 victory against Zambia over a week ago.

However, Nigeria remain fifth in Africa behind Tunisia (28th in the world) – who have become number one in Africa followed by – Egypt (30th), Senegal (32nd) and Congo DR (35th) in that order.                                                                       Continue reading

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Man accused of sleeping with married woman in edo state was false & an illegal act of Brazen Impunity By a Lawless Policeman in Benin City.

 

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Please be informed that the trending online video of the brazen abduction and battery of a young man in Benin City is now subject of a Criminal Investigation in Edo State.

The victim of the abduction and battery deny every allegation of amorous impropriety made in the said video.

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Continue reading

Hollywood’s Heinous ‘Casting Couch’ Culture That Enabled Harvey Weinstein

Hollywood’s Heinous ‘Casting Couch’ Culture That Enabled Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein’s alleged assault and harassment of the countless womenwho’ve now spoken out against him—not to mention the many others likely still preparing to come forward—was evil in a very specific, individual way. As co-founder of Miramax and The Weinstein Company, his apparent intimidation, coercion, and rape of actresses and employees were heinous offenses, and should be judged—by which I mean condemned—in their own right. He was, by all media accounts, a monster who used his power and influence to terrorize, all in order to satisfy his perverse sexual desires. His fall from grace is justly deserved.                                                                          Continue reading

Which Was Worse for Puerto Rico, Hurricane Maria or Hurricane Donald?

Which Was Worse for Puerto Rico, Hurricane Maria or Hurricane Donald?

As Hurricane Irma bore down on my Florida home, just before it broke away at the last second, I sat in the shuttered semi-darkness, listening to the wind gradually spooling up to the monolith-from-2001 howl, asking myself what I was doing:

“This state is a 450-mile long limestone mistake barely set above two giant bodies of water. It is a strip of grassy muck and bugs meant to be kicked and spun and vacuumed to death between two vast reserves of power, and maybe it was wrong to ever set foot here.”

As I’ve written before, the great, slow anxiety of a storm is asking what destiny is written for you and waiting to meet it. The roof will hold or it won’t. The ground will flood or it won’t. You think only of what the storm has chosen and not the many little things that, in its aftermath, men will choose too. What you do not ask—what the people of Puerto Rico might have long since stopped asking, in the month since Irma and the three weeks since the Category 5 Maria put the island through a Cuisinart—is if anyone else will care.                                                       Continue reading

Over the past week, a wave of sexual harassment and assault allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein have emerged through a series of investigations published by The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Following the reports, more and more women have spoken publicly about their experiences with Weinstein.

Most of these alleged encounters follow a similar pattern, of “business meetings” turning into a proposed massage and hotel room sexual harassment or assault. These accusations start as early as the 1980s and include actresses, assistants, and other employees of Weinstein’s companies.

With the catalog of alleged abuse growing, women like Gwyneth Paltrow, who accused Weinstein of touching her inappropriately in 1995, want to support women in similar situations by coming forward.

“We’re at a point in time when women need to send a clear message that this is over,” Paltrow told The New York Times. “This way of treating women ends now.”

These are all the women who have come forward with accusations of Harvey Weinstein committing sexual harassment or assault, spanning decades.

Note: A handful of women told their stories anonymously—including one who described an alleged rape to The New Yorker—but we did not include those stories in this list.

Gwyneth Paltrow

Gwyneth PaltrowplayGwyneth Paltrow

 (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

When Paltrow was 22 years old, Weinstein hired her to star in the 1995 movie “Emma.” Before filming began, the actress told The New York Times that Weinstein invited her up to his room at the Peninsula Beverly Hills hotel for what she thought would be a professional meeting.

Paltrow told the Times that the meeting ended with Weinstein touching her and suggesting they massage each other. “I was a kid, I was signed up, I was petrified,” she said.

Paltrow said she refused Weinstein’s advances. She told her boyfriend at the time, Brad Pitt, about what happened. After Pitt confronted Weinstein, Weinstein told Paltrow not to tell anyone else about the incident, she recounted to the Times. “I thought he was going to fire me,” Paltrow said. Pitt confirmed this story to the Times in an email.

Paltrow, however, continued to appear in Weinstein movies. In 1998, Paltrow won the Oscar for best actress for her work in “Shakespeare in Love,” which Weinstein produced, and she thanked Weinstein in her speech.

Paltrow told the Times that she felt like she had to keep up appearances to save her career. “He was alternately generous and supportive and championing, and punitive and bullying,” she said.

Angelina Jolie

Angelina JolieplayAngelina Jolie

 (Mary Altaffer/AP Images)

The actress, director, and humanitarian didn’t go into detail of her encounter with Weinstein, but she told The New York Times that she had a “bad experience” while shooting the 1998 movie “Playing by Heart.”

“I had a bad experience with Harvey Weinstein in my youth, and as a result, chose never to work with him again and warn others when they did,” she said. “This behavior towards women in any field, any country is unacceptable.”

Ashley Judd

Ashley JuddplayAshley Judd

 (Getty Images)

Judd went on the record in The New York Times that 20 years ago, Weinstein invited her to the Peninsula Beverly Hills hotel for what Judd thought would be a professional breakfast meeting.

Judd said she was shocked when Weinstein sent her up to his room instead. Judd said Weinsteinappeared in a bathrobe, offered her a massage, and asked her if she wanted to watch him take a shower.

She said she felt “panicky, trapped,” and said if Weinstein wanted to touch her, she would have to win an Oscar for one of his movies first.

“There’s a lot on the line, the cachet that came with Miramax,” Judd told the Times. Years later, Judd appeared in two more Weinstein films, but said Weinstein didn’t harass her again.

Rose McGowan

Rose McGowanplayRose McGowan

 (Frazer Harrison/Getty)

McGowan reached a $100,000 settlement with Weinstein in 1997, according to a legal document reviewed by the Times. The legal document said that the settlement was “not to be construed as an admission” of harassment by Weinstein, but rather intended to “avoid litigation and buy peace.”

In 1997, McGowan was between work on the horror film “Scream” — which was produced by Weinstein’s brother, Bob Weinstein, and his Dimension Films studio — and The WB show “Charmed.”

McGowan was 23 years old when she reached the settlement with Weinstein, following what the Times described as “an episode in a hotel room during the Sundance Film Festival.”

Although McGowan declined to comment for the article, since it came out, she’s been very outspoken on Twitter. She’s calling for people to sign a petition to bring down The Weinstein’s Company board, and it has over 6,400 signatures so far, with a goal of 10,000.

Mira Sorvino

Mira SorvinoplayMira Sorvino

 (Getty Images)

Mira Sorvino told The New Yorker that Weinstein tried to give her massage in a hotel room at the 1995 Toronto Film Festival, where she was promoting her movie “Mighty Aphrodite.”

“He started massaging my shoulders, which made me very uncomfortable,” Sorvino told The New Yorker. “And then [he] tried to get more physical, sort of chasing me around.”

Weeks later, Weinstein showed up late at night to her New York City apartment, she said, so she called a guy friend to come to her place and pretend to be her boyfriend to scare Weinstein off. She told The New Yorker that Weinstein showed up before her friend, and when she told him her “boyfriend” was coming over, he got angry and left.

Sorvino told The New Yorker that she struggled for years whether to come forward with her story, in fear that her career in film could be ruined, especially because Weinstein helped her career so much. “I have great respect for Harvey as an artist,” Sorvino said, “and owe him and his brother a debt of gratitude for the early success in my career, including the Oscar.”

Sorvino appeared in other Weinstein films after the incident, and remains close friends with his brother, Bob Weinstein. Sorvino told The New Yorker that she never told Bob about Harvey’s actions.

Asia Argento

Asia ArgentoplayAsia Argento

 (Getty Images)

The Italian film actress and director told The New Yorker that Weinstein forced oral sex on her in 1997. Argento said she did not speak out until now because she was scared Weinstein would “crush” her. “I know he has crushed a lot of people before,” Argento told The New Yorker. “That’s why this story — in my case, it’s 20 years old, some of them are older — has never come out.”

Weinstein “terrified me, and he was so big,” she said. “It wouldn’t stop. It was a nightmare.” Argento told The New Yorker she eventually started to pretend she enjoyed the assault with the hope that doing so would make it end sooner.

In 2000, a movie Argento wrote and directed, “Scarlet Diva,” was released. It includes a scene that’s similar to what she allegedly went through with Weinstein three years earlier.

Rosanna Arquette

Rosanna ArquetteplayRosanna Arquette

 (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty)

Arquette told The New Yorker and The New York Times that one evening in the early 90s, she was supposed to meet Weinstein at the Beverly Hills Hotel to pick up a script. Once she got to the hotel, she was asked to meet Weinstein in his room.

Arquette said that Weinstein opened the door wearing a white bathrobe, and told her his neck was sore and he needed a massage. She told him that she could recommend a good masseuse. “Then he grabbed my hand,” she said, and put it on his neck. She said that when she yanked her hand away, Weinstein grabbed it again and pulled it toward his visible and erect penis. “My heart was really racing. I was in a fight-or-flight moment,” Arquette said. She recalls telling Weinstein, “I will never do that.”

Arquette said that Weinstein told her that rejecting him was huge mistake, and believes her career suffered in the aftermath. “He made things very difficult for me for years,” Arquette told The New Yorker. She appeared in one Weinstein film after the incident, “Pulp Fiction,” and told The New Yorker she got the role due to Weinstein’s deference to the film’s director, Quentin Tarantino.

Jessica Barth

Jessica BarthplayJessica Barth

 (Getty Images)

The actress told The New Yorker that she met Weinstein at a 2011 Golden Globes party.

She said Weinstein invited her to have a business meeting to discuss “career stuff” at the Peninsula hotel. When he arrived, he asked her to come up to his room, and told her it wasn’t a big deal, he just wanted privacy.

Barth said she was shocked when she arrived in the room to see that Weinstein had ordered champagne and sushi.

Barth told The New Yorker that he offered to cast her in a film and demanded a naked massage in bed. “So, what would happen if, say, we’re having some champagne and I take my clothes off and you give me a massage?” he asked, she recounted. “And I’m, like, ‘That’s not going to happen,’” Barth recalled responding.

When she tried to leave, she said Weinstein got angry and told her that she needed to lose weight “to compete with Mila Kunis,” before promising her a meeting with one of his female executives. “He gave me her number, and I walked out and I started bawling,” Barth said.

Barth told the publication that the meeting with the female executive was just a formality. “I just knew it was bulls—,” she said.

Emma de Caunes

Emma de CaunesplayEmma de Caunes

 (Getty images)

The French actress told The New Yorker that she met Weinstein at a party at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival. A few months later, he invited her to a lunch meeting at the Hôtel Ritz in Paris, she said.

She told The New Yorker that Weinstein told her about a film he was producing based on a book, with a strong female role. He couldn’t remember the title of the book, but he said he had a copy upstairs in his room.

Weinstein pleaded with her and she eventually agreed to go up to his room to get the book, she said. She didn’t want to go up, since she was running late for work. She said that she got a work call on the way to the room, and Weinstein went into the bathroom but he left the door open. De Caunes says that she assumed he was just washing his hands.

“When I hung up the phone, I heard the shower go on in the bathroom,” de Caunes said. “I was, like, What the f—, is he taking a shower?” Weinstein came out, de Caunes said, naked and with an erection.

Weinstein then told her to lie on the bed and mentioned that many other women had done so before her, she said. De Caunes told Weinstein that she was leaving, and he panicked. De Caunes said that Weinstein called her non-stop over the next few hours, offering gifts and saying thatnothing happened.

“I know that everybody—I mean everybody—in Hollywood knows that it’s happening,” de Caunes told The New Yorker. “He’s not even really hiding. I mean, the way he does it, so many people are involved and see what’s happening. But everyone’s too scared to say anything.”

Judith Godrèche

Judith GodrècheplayJudith Godrèche

 (Getty Images)

The French actress told The New York Times that Weinstein sexually harassed her in 1996 in Cannes.

Upstairs in his hotel room, Weinstein asked to give her a massage, Godrèche told the Times. She said no, and Godrèche recalled Weinstein telling her that massages are an American custom.

“The next thing I know, he’s pressing against me and pulling off my sweater,” she told the Times. She pulled away and left the hotel room.

Godrèche told the Times that she called the female executive who was present at an earlier meeting with Weinstein, and the woman told her not to talk about it, since it could potentially hurt the success of her film.

Cara Delevigne

Cara DelevigneplayCara Delevigne

 (Emma McIntyre/Getty)

In a statement sent to journalist Yashar Ali, actress and model Cara Delevigne shared her experience with Weinstein. Delevigne also shared her story on Instagram:

“When I first started to work as an actress, I was working on a film and I received a call from‎ Harvey Weinstein asking if I had slept with any of the women I was seen out with in the media. It was a very odd and uncomfortable call….I answered none of his questions and hurried off the phone but before I hung up, he said to me that if I was gay or decided to be with a woman especially in public that I’d never get the role of a straight woman or make it as an actress in Hollywood. A year or two later, I went to a meeting with him in the lobby of a hotel with a director about an upcoming film. The director left the meeting and Harvey asked me to stay and chat with him. As soon as we were alone he began to brag about all the actresses he had slept with and how he had made their careers and spoke about other inappropriate things of a sexual nature. He then invited me to his room. I quickly declined and asked his assistant if my car was outside. She said it wasn’t and wouldn’t be for a bit and I should go to his room. At that moment I felt very powerless and scared but didn’t want to act that way hoping that I was wrong about the situation. When I arrived I was relieved to find another woman in his room and thought immediately I was safe. He asked us to kiss and she began some sort of advances upon his direction. I swiftly got up and asked him if he knew that I could sing. And I began to sing….I thought it would make the situation better….more professional….like an audition….I was so nervous. After singing I said again that I had to leave. He walked me to the door and stood in front of it and tried to kiss me on the lips. I stopped him and managed to get out of the room. I still got the part for the film and always thought that he gave it to me because of what happened. Since then I felt awful that I did the movie. I felt like I didn’t deserve the part. I was so hesitant about speaking out….I didn’t want to hurt his family. I felt guilty as if I did something wrong. I was also terrified that this sort of thing had happened to so many women I know but no one had said anything because of fear.”

Léa Seydoux

Léa SeydouxplayLéa Seydoux

 (Getty Images)

The actress who’s starred in “Spectre” and “Midnight in Paris” published a revealing essay in The Guardian on Wednesday, depicting her experiences with Weinstein.

“When I first met Harvey Weinstein, it didn’t take me long to figure him out,” Seydoux wrote. “We were at a fashion show. He was charming, funny, smart – but very domineering. He wanted to meet me for drinks and insisted we had to make an appointment that very night. This was never going to be about work. He had other intentions – I could see that very clearly.”

Seydoux said that she went up to his hotel room for a drink.

“We were talking on the sofa when he suddenly jumped on me and tried to kiss me. I had to defend myself. He’s big and fat, so I had to be forceful to resist him. I left his room, thoroughly disgusted. I wasn’t afraid of him, though. Because I knew what kind of man he was all along.”

Seydoux also said that she’s heard him say misogynistic things to her, including bragging about his sexual experiences with famous actresses, and that one time he told her, “You’d be better if you lost weight.”

Seydoux ended her piece saying, “Only truth and justice can bring us forward.”

Lauren O’Connor

Lauren O’ConnorplayLauren O’Connor

 (Getty Images)

According to The New York Times, O’Connor, now an executive at Amazon Studios and former employee at The Weinstein Company, filed an internal memo about Weinstein’s behavior in 2015. O’Connor thought Weinstein used female employees to facilitate liaisons with “vulnerable women.”

“There is a toxic environment for women at this company,” O’Connor said in the letter, addressed to several executives at the company. “I am a 28-year-old woman trying to make a living and a career. Harvey Weinstein is a 64-year-old, world famous man and this is his company. The balance of power is me: 0, Harvey Weinstein: 10. I am a professional and have tried to be professional. I am not treated that way however. I am sexualized and diminished. “

In the letter, O’Connor also explained how upset she was by what she witnessed as an employee at The Weinstein Company. “I am just starting out in my career, and have been and remain fearful about speaking up,” O’Connor wrote in the memo. “But remaining silent is causing me great distress.”

Romola Garai

Romola GaraiplayRomola Garai

 (Getty Images)

The British actress who appeared on BBC’s “The Hour” and 2007’s “Atonement” told The Guardian that when she was 18 years old, she auditioned for Weinstein in a hotel room at the Savoy Hotel in London, wearing nothing but a dressing gown.

“Like every other woman in the industry, I’ve had an ‘audition’ with Harvey Weinstein, where I’d actually already had the audition but you had to be personally approved by him,” Garai told The Guardian. “So I had to go to his hotel room in the Savoy, and he answered the door in his bathrobe. I was only 18. I felt violated by it, it has stayed very clearly in my memory.”

Lauren Sivan

Lauren SivanplayLauren Sivan

 (Frederick M. Brown / Stringer/Getty Images)

The TV reporter told The Huffington Post that in 2007, Weinstein cornered her at a New York City restaurant and tried to kiss her. When she refused his advances, he told her to “stand there and be quiet,” and, according to Sivan, began to masturbate in front of her. He ejaculated into a plant.

Sivan spoke about the harassment with Megyn Kelly, calling it “disgusting and kind of pathetic.”

“Twenty minutes earlier he was having this great conversation with me,” Sivan told Kelly. “I felt so great and flattered by it. And then to stand there and be quiet just a few minutes later just negated any warm feelings.”

Louisette Geiss

Louisette GeissplayLouisette Geiss

 (Getty Images)

The former actress and screenwriter said that during what was supposed to be a pitch meeting to discuss her screenwriting at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, Weinstein exposed himself to her in a hotel room, then masturbated in front of her in a nearby hot tub.

On Tuesday, Geiss held a press conference her attorney Gloria Allred, a women’s rights advocate who is taking both Bill Cosby and President Donald Trump to court for their alleged sexual misconduct against women.

Heather Graham

Heather GrahamplayHeather Graham

 (Getty Images)

In a guest column for Variety, the “Boogie Nights” star came forward with her personal experience with Weinstein in the early 2000s. Graham said that Weinstein implied she had to sleep with him in order to get a role in one of his movies:

“There was a pile of scripts sitting on his desk. ‘I want to put you in one of my movies,’ he said and offered to let me choose which one I liked best. Later in the conversation, he mentioned that he had an agreement with his wife. He could sleep with whomever he wanted when he was out of town. I walked out of the meeting feeling uneasy. There was no explicit mention that to star in one of those films I had to sleep with him, but the subtext was there.”

Graham had the opportunity to meet with Weinstein again, but didn’t because she was uncomfortable, she said. He never cast her in any of his films.

“My hope,” Graham wrote in Variety, “is that this moment starts a dialogue on redefining sexual harassment in the workplace and empowers women to speak out when they feel uncomfortable in a situation. I hope that dialogue covers the gray areas where we ask ourselves, ‘Did what I thinkhappen just happen?’ and that we are no longer shamed into feeling that we should grow a thicker skin, or that our story ‘isn’t good enough to count.’”

Ambra Battilana Gutierrez

The New Yorker wrote that Weinstein allegedly groped the Italian model’s breasts and reached under her skirt in March 2015. She was a finalist in the Miss Italy contest, and reportedly met Weinstein at a reception for “New York Spring Spectacular,” a show that he produced.

After they met, Weinstein expressed interest in a business meeting. During their meeting, Gutierrez said that Weinstein groped her breasts after asking if they were real, and put his hand up her skirt.

Instead of meeting Weinstein at a play that night, Gutierrez went to the NYPD. Investigators from the Special Victims Division had Gutierrez meet Weinstein the following day, wearing a wire that could incriminate him.

In the recording, which you can listen to here, Weinstein lists actresses whose careers he has helped. He pressures Gutierrez to join him in his hotel room while he showers. Gutierrez says no repeatedly but Weinstein insists. In the recording, Gutierrez asks him why he groped her the day before.

“Oh, please, I’m sorry, just come on in,” Weinstein says. “I’m used to that. Come on. Please.”

“You’re used to that?” Gutierrez says.

“Yes,” Weinstein says. “I won’t do it again.”

After nearly two minutes of back-and-forth, Weinstein finally agrees to let her leave.

When Gutierrez returned downstairs, detectives took Weinstein away for questioning. After a two-week investigation, the Manhattan district attorney decided not to file charges.

After her story was published in The New Yorker, the model shared this photo on Instagram:

Lucia Evans

Evans told The New Yorker that she gave Weinstein her number in 2004 when she was an aspiring actress and college student. She told the magazine that Weinstein started calling her late at night asking to meet, all offers she declined.

She eventually met Weinstein at the Miramax office in New York City during the day, knowing there would be a woman present. After both demeaning her and complimenting her (he told her she should lose weight) Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex on him, she said.

“I said, over and over, ‘I don’t want to do this, stop, don’t,'” Stoller told The New Yorker. “I tried to get away, but maybe I didn’t try hard enough. I didn’t want to kick him or fight him. He’s a big guy. He overpowered me. I just sort of gave up. That’s the most horrible part of it, and that’s why he’s been able to do this for so long to so many women: People give up, and then they feel like it’s their fault.”

Laura Madden

The former Miramax employee told The New York Times that Weinstein tried to get her to give him massages in Dublin and London beginning in 1991. Madden said that he had a way of making anyone who objected feel bad about it. “It was so manipulative,” she told the Times. “You constantly question yourself — am I the one who is the problem?”

Katherine Kendall

The “Swingers” star told The New York Times that in 1993, Weinstein exposed himself and chased her around a living room. She also told the Times that this encounter diminished her interest in working in the entertainment industry.

“This is Harvey Weinstein,” Kendall recalls telling herself at the time. She felt that if she told anyone about it, she would “never work again and no one is going to care or believe me.”

Emily Nestor

In December 2014, Nestor worked as a temporary front desk assistant at The Weinstein Company.

On her first day, Nestor told The New Yorker, two employees at the company told her that she was Weinstein’s “type.” When Weinstein arrived at the office, he made comments about her appearance, referring to her as “the pretty girl,” she said.

Nestor agreed to a private meeting during the day, after Weinstein had requested to get drinks in the evening, she said. Nestor met Weinstein at the Peninsula hotel in Beverly Hills.

Weinstein offered Nestor career help, and then he began to brag about his sexual liaisons with other women, including famous actresses, she recounted. “He said, ‘You know, we could have a lot of fun,’” Nestor told The New Yorker. “I could put you in my London office, and you could work there and you could be my girlfriend.” She said no. Nestor said that, Weinstein replied, “Oh, the girls always say no. You know, ‘No, no.’ And then they have a beer or two and then they’re throwing themselves at me.”

Weinstein also told Nestor that “he’d never had to do anything like Bill Cosby.”

Nestor told The New Yorker, “I was very afraid of him. And I knew how well-connected he was. And how if I pissed him off then I could never have a career in that industry.”

Nestor told the friend who helped her get the job about what happened, and he filed a complaint to HR. Nestor told The New Yorker that she talked company officials about Weinstein’s actions, but didn’t pursue it any further.

Liza Campbell

The British writer told The Sun Times that Weinstein was helping her get a job as a freelance script reader in the 90s. He met with her in a London hotel room and asked her to bathe with him, she said.

“He sat down, chatted for a few minutes and then excused himself and left the room through a far door, where I could see a short passage that connected to the bedroom and the bathroom. I assumed he had gone for a pee,” Campbell said. “I could hear him moving around and suddenly the sound of bath taps running. ‘What do you say we both jump in the bath?’ he hollered. I could hear the thump of shoes being taken off and felt shocked that the meeting had turned sleazy.”

Campbell told the Sun Times that Weinstein kept provoking her, “Come on, it’ll be fun,” he said. “We can drink champagne. You can soap me.”

“What I said very loudly was, ‘If you come back into this room with no clothes on I’m going to f—ing lose my temper,’” Campbell told the Sun Times.

Campbell tried to leave the hotel room, but the door she entered in was locked, she said. A second door she thought could be her escape was also locked. She found a third door, which opened and she escaped the room, she told the Sun Times.

Tomi-Ann Roberts

In 1984, Tomi-Ann Roberts, now a psychology professor at Colorado College, was a 20-year-old college student interested in pursuing an acting career. Roberts told The New York Times that Weinstein was a regular customer at the restaurant where she worked as a waitress.

Roberts said that Weinstein wanted her to audition for a movie he was directing with his brother, Bob. Weinstein had her meet him where he was staying. When she got there, Roberts said he was nude in a bathtub.

Weinstein told her that if she was comfortable getting naked in front of him, she would have a better chance at landing the role, she said. Roberts told the Times that Weinstein said that if she couldn’t get naked in private, she would never have a career in film.

Roberts recalled apologizing to Weinstein on her way out, for being too uptight to take off her clothes in front of him. Later, Roberts remembers feeling manipulated since Weinstein had clearly been pretending to be interested in her professionally, she said.

“I was nobody! How had I ever thought otherwise?” she said to the Times.

Dawn Dunning

Dunning met Weinstein in 2003. She was going to design school, working as a waitress, and taking small acting gigs. She met Weinstein at the nightclub where she worked, according to her interview with The New York Times.

Dunning had a lunch scheduled with Weinstein at a Manhattan restaurant. But when she got there, she was told to meet him in his hotel room because he was running late.

When she got to the room, Weinstein was in a bathrobe, behind a coffee table covered with papers, she said.

Dunning said that Weinstein told her the papers were contracts for his next three films, but she could only sign them if she had a threesome with him.

Dunning recalled laughing, assuming it was a joke, which made Weinstein angry.

“You’ll never make it in this business,” Dunning said he told her. “This is how the business works.” Dunning left the room, and when Weinstein’s assistant called her the next day, she hung up.

Dunning didn’t pursue acting much longer, and instead became a costume designer.

Zoe Brock

Brock, a model and writer from New Zealand, wrote in a blog post and told The Guardian that Weinstein sexually harassed her in 1997, when she was 23 years old.

Brock, now 43, said that she met Weinstein at the Cannes film festival. She sat with him at a dinner. They had a nice conversation, and she joined Weinstein and a large group of people for a night out.

After midnight, Weinstein offered to drive her back to his hotel to continue the partying. At the hotel, with several other people in the room, they opened champagne. But then the other people left, Brock said.

“My body went into high alert. I was drunk, young, miles from home, without cash to get a cab, and no cell phone,” she said. “Harvey left the room, but not for long. He re-emerged naked a couple of minutes later and asked if I would give him a massage. Panicking, in shock, I remember weighing up the options and wondering how much I needed to placate him to keep myself safe.”

Brock said that Weinstein begged her to give him a massage. “I shrugged Harvey’s hands off me, ran into the bathroom and locked the door. Harvey chased me, d—, balls and all, and banged on the door with his fists, pleading with me to come out.”

When she exited the bathroom, Brock said Weinstein was crying and said that Brock had rejected him because he was fat.

“No one believed my story,” Brock said. “They all thought I had slept with Weinstein.”

Louise Godbold

Godbold wrote about her encounter with Weinstein in an essay. Godbold said that she was one of the women he “preyed upon” in the early 90s.

Goldbod didn’t go into much detail, but noted that her story is very similar to the others:

“The office tour that became an occasion to trap me in an empty meeting room, the begging for a massage, his hands on my shoulders as I attempted to beat a retreat … all while not wanting to alienate the most powerful man in Hollywood.”

POLICE _’Davido’s security car escorted the car used in transporting dead Tagbo to hospital.- Video of Lagos police commissioner speaking on Tagbo, DJ Olu’s death

On Wednesday, October 11th, 2017 The Commissioner of Police, Lagos State Command, Imohimi Edgar addressed journalists and shared new details surrounding the recent deaths of Mr Tagbo Umeike, Oluwagbemiga Abiodun a.k.a DJ Olu and Chime Amaechi.

Speaking on Tagbo’s death, the commissioner revealed that he had a meeting with Tagbo’s family, Davido and Caroline Danjuma whom he referred to Tagbo’s fiancee.

He also spoke on DJ Olu and Chime Amaechina’s death saying that substances suspected to be hard drugs were recovered in DJ Olu’s car. He revealed that investigation is still ongoing and the substances discovered in the car have been taken for analysis to determine what exactly they are. Watch the exclusive  video below …


 

 

Send Your Name to Mars Aboard NASA’s InSight Lander!

Want to send your name to Mars? NASA is offering another chance to do so.

When the InSight lander launches to the Red Planet next year, it will contain the names of members of the public, and you can submit your name for it to be included.

In 2015, the space agency invited people from around the world to add their names to a silicon chip that will be affixed to the InSight Mars lander. With nearly 827,000 individuals already signed up, NASA is now adding a second microchip, giving members of the public another chance to put their names on Mars.

“Mars continues to excite space enthusiasts of all ages,” Bruce Banerdt, the InSight mission’s principal investigator, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement. “This opportunity lets them become a part of the spacecraft that will study the inside of the Red Planet.” [NASA Mars InSight Lander Mission Gallery (Images)]                       Continue reading